Bankers Do It With Interest

Sid emerges from the hotel room. He stretches. He smiles.

That’s when Jane walks up. She hands him an envelope.

“What’s this?” he asks.

He is reflexively opening it. Inside there is a check.

“It’s your interest.”

Jane attempts to peek through the door behind Sid. Sid stands in her way.

“My interest?”

“Bankers do it with interest,” Jane says. “Everyone knows that. But nobody knows who’s responsible for making sure it happens! So I took it on myself.”

“I see,” Sid says.

“You’re blushing!”

Sid blushes more brightly. Jane attempts to see through the door again. Sid closes the door.

“I also thought I’d get a chance to figure out what ‘it’ is,” Jane admits. “I mean, this way.”

“Nobody knows,” Sid says, quite seriously. “It probably has something to do with the Mayan calendar expiring in 2012.”

“Ah! It’s one of those mystery conspiracy things.”

Jane looks smug.

Thought so,” Jane says.

“Now,” says Sid, trying to act casual, “if you’ll excuse me, I should go, er, check on the status of, er, Neptune.”

“Oh!” says Jane. She looks embarrassed. “I’d almost forgotten about Neptune. I haven’t done anything about it in forever. I’ll come with you.”

“This is a special Neptune,” Sid says. “It’s personal.”

“Oh. Okay.”

“Thanks for understanding,” Sid says. He examines the interest check one more time. “Er, is this all?”

“Bankers compound it annually!”

“Thank you,” Sid says. He edges open the door, ducks inside, and is gone.

“Yay!” Jane checks a name off her list. “Now to make sure that that librarian is doing it by the book!”

That’s right, world! Jane is on the case!

6 thoughts on “Bankers Do It With Interest

  1. Weirdly, this one makes me sad. Maybe it’s because I don’t know if Jane, as who she is, is ever going to find out what “it” is, and if she doesn’t, I think that’s sad.

  2. Just because Jane isn’t Jenna any more doesn’t mean she’s lost her memory. There’s much to indicate that she hasn’t.

  3. I don’t mean she’s lost her memory. I just mean she’s a child, and it’s not clear that she can cease to be a child and not cease to be Jane.

  4. Yes, Jane’s age is a matter of categorization rather than chronology (as I believe Rebecca has said in the past). Nonetheless, I do not think that a child and a teenager are necessarily disjoint entities; if they were, where would one draw the line?

Leave a Reply